Oops, That Kernel Didn’t Work!

Being security conscious, I try to keep everything up to date. This includes the Linux kernel that is the heart of our systems.

In keeping with that, a few weeks ago I changed all of my Mint 17.3 machines to the kernel recommended in the kernel chooser.

Kernel chooser

Kernel chooser

As you can see above, I’m running the kernel recommended by Linux Mint. This went well for all but one of my machines. My bedside, 4 processor, 8 gigs of RAM machine seemed to run fine for a week or so, but I found that when running certain software packages; the computer would completely freeze. Anything to do with video or graphics would freeze at random times with no warning.

Scouring the logs was pointless, as the freeze happened before anything was logged.

At first I blamed a new wireless keyboard / mouse combo that was purchased at the same time. Putting a USB set back in, proved the wireless was not the cause.

Searching the Mint and other forums showed that many people were having the same problem I was. A combination of the processor type and graphics card seemd to be to blame.

By this time I had already removed the previous kernel, so it was time to put it back!

Open your Update Manager, click on View, and then select Linux kernels

In my case, I re-installed the 3.13 kernel that had been working flawlessly before. Of course if there are notes about security issues or regressions that could impact your system, then chose another.

Installing a different kernel

Installing a different kernel

Next you need to edit the GRUB config file, as I was booting quietly, not displaying the boot menu. To do that, simply drop to a terminal and edit it with your favorite text editor. I use medit

$ sudo medit /etc/default/grub

will open your text editor in super user mode.

Edit grub

Edit grub

Editing Grub

Editing Grub

You’ll see in the above example, I’ve commented out, using the # symbol, to have the boot process ignore the two commands at lines 7 and 8. Doing this, will now let me see the grub boot menu at startup. Save and close the file, and then, it’s very important that you tell grub that you’ve changed it. Do this by issuing the command:

$ sudo update-grub

Now it’s time to reboot. When you do, at the grub boot window, arrow down to Select previous Linux version, and select that.

Once you’ve booted up, and after you are satisfied that there are no issues with the new kernel, you can then go back into the update manager and un-install the previous kernel that was giving you fits.

Note: After much experimenting, I was able to upgrade to kernel 3.16, and maintain a stable machine!