Tag Archives: Audio

Software: Record Audio From Any Source

There’s a handy Linux tool  you may wish to try, if you’d like to record audio on your computer. It’s Called simply, Audio Recorder

Package Manager showing Audio-Recorder

Package Manager showing Audio-Recorder

Yes, there are all kinds of other ways to record audio into your Linux computer. Personally, I use Audacity for the majority of my recording needs, but what if you’re listening to a live broadcast on-line? That’s where Audio-Recorder comes in handy.

Audio-Recorder will not only record an external source, like your old cassette deck or the radio, but it will actually record anything that is coming through your speakers!

Audio-Recorder

Audio-Recorder

After you launch Audio-Recorder, you will see a nice big Start Recording button in the upper left side of the window.

Anything that is currently playing in your speakers, will be automatically recorded. You can input your own file name, or else the software will use the current date and time that the recording started.

You can record on the .ogg, .mp3, .wav, .flac, or .spx audio formats by choosing the format in the menu before you start recording.

Where Audio Recorder becomes really handy, is when you use the built-in timer to automatically start recording. You can specify a start time, end time, and even a pause and restart time.

Under the Additional Settings button, you can specify your desired record location and default audio source.

Additional Settings

Additional Settings

So add Audio Recorder to your utilities, it may come in handy the next time you want to record live internet radio!

 

 

Audio Players: QMMP

If you open your Software Manager, you will find tons of media players available. Here on the farm, we like to keep things simple, and like a clean interface. To that end, our favorite player is QMMP.

QMMP Audio Player

QMMP Audio Player

What we really like about this player, is not only the simple and clean design, but also the fact that having multiple play-lists are very easy to manage. In the example above, near the bottom, you will see 8 different play lists at the bottom. ZZ for instance, is our fall asleep play list. and so on.

QMMP has another nice feature, in that it can be skinned using standard Winamp skins, so you can have your player look like anything you want!

QMMP Settings

QMMP Settings

A simple search of the web (don’t use google folks, for privacy, we recommend Startpage.com!) for Winamp skins, will find lots of decorations available for the player as in this fun example below:

QMMP Skinned

QMMP Skinned

QMMP will play anything you want to feed it, from MP3s and Wav files, to Mpeg, ACC and OGG files too!

 

Tagging Audio

OK, so you’ve got your audio recorded and ready to play, but there is one more thing you should do!

Tag your MP3 files

Tag your MP3 files

EasyTag is a great piece of software that will allow you to add cover art, insert creation date, artist, title, and lots of other neat stuff to your audio creation. By tagging your MP3 files, it makes it much easier for your player to find and catagorize your music and othe recordings.

You can change the information for a single entry, or the entire folder of MP3 files. Adding cover art really perks things up when you’re putting your music on your phone or tablet.

To install, go to the Software Manager from your menu, and then seach for EasyTag. Intall it and start making you audio creations look more professional!

 

 

Editing Audio

When I started in Radio, there was only one way to edit audio. That was with a sharp razor blade and a roll of splicing tape!

If you wanted to do a nice fade-out in a pre-recorded audio piece, you either had to run it back through the mixer and record it again, doing the fade manually, or you could use my old trick of using a small magnet, bringing it slowly towards the running tape to fade out, or away from the tape to fade in.

My how times have changed!

There are some wonderful audio tools available for Linux. My favorite is Audacity.audacity

You can find it in your Software Manager of any Linux distribution.

Once installed, you can import your favorite tunes, create mix tapes, correct audio problems, and a host of other things. Once your creation is done, you can then export it as any audio format you wish. MP3 being the most popular of course.

The real magic of Audacity comes to play when you are using the software to record from other media for editing and archiving as MP3 or WAV files.

A project I’ve been working on for 8 full years now, is archiving over 50 years of old reel to reel audio tape.
Our Family has worked in radio and television for well over 50 years. Something those of us in the industry are fond of doing is making Air Checks of our work. Live recordings of our shows, newscasts etc.

Using my tried and true, Teac, 7010 reel to reel deck, and an old Pentium 4 running Linux, I’ve been dubbing off hundreds and hundreds of old tapes. Some of them so old that the tape has to be reinforced before it can even be played.

My deck runs at speeds of 3 3/4 and 7 1/2 inches per second. Industry standard speeds. What happens when I mount a tape that was recorded at 15 inches per second? Easy, just record it at 7 1/2 into Audacity, and then use the Speed tool to then change the recording to the original 15ips.

Tape hiss, gone. Poor modulation, gone. 1000+ audio tapes clogging up the house, gone! Dubbing off your old record collection? Audacity can filter many of the problems found in vinyl recordings like clicks, pops, scratches, etc.

Audacity has saved my sanity with my adult autistic son. Because of his auditory processing problems, he perceives sound a lot different than the rest of us. After giving him some quick instruction on Audacity, he was able to experiment with his classical music recordings to make them sound ‘normal’ to him. What he ended up with, is changing the pitch of everything he listens to by +4.176 percent!

Audacity is powerful audio editing, right on your desktop. Give it a try!

Now, if you are a real nut for editing audio, then try Musix, an entire Linux distribution made just for audio and video editing!