Tag Archives: Kernel

Kernel 4.4.15 Long Term Support Is Out – It’s Great!

In my  last post I mentioned that I had to downgrade my kernel for Linux Mint 18 because of freezing issues with the 4.4.0 that shipped with Mint 18.tux

With the announcement and release just yesterday of the newest long term support kernel 4.4.15, I decided to bite my lip and give it a try, as I really wanted to have all that is new and improved on my primary computer.

Heading back to the Ubuntu repository, I was able to find, download and install 4.4.15 using the same steps outlined in my last post.

My first impression after running it for 24 hours, it’s great!  Just 1 freeze so far, unlike all the freezing I had with 4.4.0.

Well done to the Linux Kernel team!

Oops, That Kernel Didn’t Work!

Being security conscious, I try to keep everything up to date. This includes the Linux kernel that is the heart of our systems.

In keeping with that, a few weeks ago I changed all of my Mint 17.3 machines to the kernel recommended in the kernel chooser.

Kernel chooser

Kernel chooser

As you can see above, I’m running the kernel recommended by Linux Mint. This went well for all but one of my machines. My bedside, 4 processor, 8 gigs of RAM machine seemed to run fine for a week or so, but I found that when running certain software packages; the computer would completely freeze. Anything to do with video or graphics would freeze at random times with no warning.

Scouring the logs was pointless, as the freeze happened before anything was logged.

At first I blamed a new wireless keyboard / mouse combo that was purchased at the same time. Putting a USB set back in, proved the wireless was not the cause.

Searching the Mint and other forums showed that many people were having the same problem I was. A combination of the processor type and graphics card seemd to be to blame.

By this time I had already removed the previous kernel, so it was time to put it back!

Open your Update Manager, click on View, and then select Linux kernels

In my case, I re-installed the 3.13 kernel that had been working flawlessly before. Of course if there are notes about security issues or regressions that could impact your system, then chose another.

Installing a different kernel

Installing a different kernel

Next you need to edit the GRUB config file, as I was booting quietly, not displaying the boot menu. To do that, simply drop to a terminal and edit it with your favorite text editor. I use medit

$ sudo medit /etc/default/grub

will open your text editor in super user mode.

Edit grub

Edit grub

Editing Grub

Editing Grub

You’ll see in the above example, I’ve commented out, using the # symbol, to have the boot process ignore the two commands at lines 7 and 8. Doing this, will now let me see the grub boot menu at startup. Save and close the file, and then, it’s very important that you tell grub that you’ve changed it. Do this by issuing the command:

$ sudo update-grub

Now it’s time to reboot. When you do, at the grub boot window, arrow down to Select previous Linux version, and select that.

Once you’ve booted up, and after you are satisfied that there are no issues with the new kernel, you can then go back into the update manager and un-install the previous kernel that was giving you fits.

Note: After much experimenting, I was able to upgrade to kernel 3.16, and maintain a stable machine!

 

Mint 17.2 – Change Your Kernel

Don’t do this, unless you’re really feeling adventurous. You could break your Linux installation!

For the average Mint user, there really is no reason to ever change your current kernel, but if you’re like me and like to play with whatever is the latest, then you may want to do so.

Under Mint, changing the kernel is pretty easy, just open the Update Manager, then click on View, and then select Kernels.

Update Manager

Update Manager

Yes, there are going to be warnings, for good reasons. It is possible that on some systems, you could lose critical functions. These include wireless networking, USB devices etcetera so please be certain you want to make the change!

Update Manager

Update Manager

In the grab above, you can see what kernel I am currently using. It is however, not the kernel that Mint recommends. Scrolling down through the available kernel listings finds the kernel that is checked off as Recommended.

Kernel Selection

Kernel Selection

To change kernels, the first thing to do is highlight it, and click the button marked Install the 3.x kernel.

Once it’s installed, reboot your computer and the reopen the Update Manager to then show that your desired kernel is the one loaded.

Kernel installed and running

Kernel installed and running

Remember, there is a great resource for learning all about the Linux kernel, and that is:Kernel Newbies

Wait a day or so, and then make sure to do any security updates for the new kernel:

Updating

Updating